South Atlantic Remote Territories Media Association - Falkland Islands, Saint Helena, Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha The latest news from the Falkland Islands, Saint Helena, Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha The news that matters from the
British Territories in the South Atlantic Ocean.
 HOME
 CONTACT US
 MAILING LIST
 LINKS
 SUBMIT AN ARTICLE
 WEATHER INFO (0)
 TOURISM/TRAVEL (4)
 SNIPPETS (0)
 SHIPPING/FREIGHT (1)
 MINERAL RESOURCES (2)
 LEGAL (13)
 HERITAGE (15)
 HEALTH (16)
 GEOLOGICAL EVENTS (0)
 GEN - GOVERNMENT (6)
 FISHERIES (9)
 ENVIRONMENT (1)
 EDUCATION (9)
 BUSINESS NEWS (23)
 AGRICULTURE (4)
 ALL ISLANDS (103)
 ASCENSION ISLAND (1)
 BRIT.ANTARCTIC TER. (0)
 FALKLAND ISLANDS (36)
 S.ATLANTIC GENERAL (6)
 SAINT HELENA (48)
 SOUTH GEORGIA (5)
 TRISTAN DA CUNHA (6)
Sponsored Links


Home | October 2013 Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

S.Atlantic : St Helena's PEACOCK BUTTERFLY
Submitted by SARTMA.com (Public Relations Information Office) 26.10.2013 (Article Archived on 23.11.2013)

A live Peacock butterfly was found flying in a container from the UK following the arrival of the RMS voyage 198. It was spotted by a member of the public and removed by a customs officer, before being handed over to the Biosecurity Team.


A live Peacock butterfly was found flying in a container from the UK following the arrival of the RMS voyage 198. It was spotted by a member of the public and removed by a customs officer, before being handed over to the Biosecurity Team

PEACOCK BUTTERFLY

 

A live Peacock butterfly was found flying in a container from the UK following the arrival of the RMS voyage 198. It was spotted by a member of the public and removed by a customs officer, before being handed over to the Biosecurity Team.

 

Peacock butterflies are common in the UK during summer. The caterpillars feed on nettles and hop plants, before crawling off to find a secure, dry place for turn into a chrysalis. They will spend up to 4 weeks as a chrysalis before hatching into the adult butterfly, which is large, red in colour and so-called due to the big blue eye-spots on the wings which look like the spots on a peacocks tail.

 

The butterfly found on the wharf would have hatched before arrival from a chrysalis which is thought to have been carried into the container attached to items being imported, or the caterpillar could even have crawled into the container itself. It will be put down, pinned and added to our reference collection.

 

The Peacock butterfly isnít known to be a crop pest, and this is the first recording for St Helena. If you see any others, please call Rosie Peters or Jill Key at ANRD on 24724.

 

SHG

16 October 2013

 

<< First < PreviousArticle 20 of 41
within October 2013
Next > Last >>
      Powered by NIC.SHCopyright © 1993-2014 SARTMA.comDesign by CrownNet