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St Helena : Business News from St. Helena (05/07/06)
Submitted by Saint Helena Herald (Juanita Brock) 08.05.2006 (Article Archived on 22.05.2006)

A historical flight of a Safeair Hercules took Place over Prosperous Bay Plain last Tuesday.

BUSINESS NEWS FROM ST. HELENA


 


SAFAIR MAKE HISTORIC OVER-FLIGHT OF ST. HELENA


 


By J. Brock (SARTMA)


 


Source: St. Helena Herald


 


A Hercules C-130 – otherwise known as the pregnant airplane - from Safair Ltd. out of Walvis Bay in Namibia.  The airframe took off from Walvis Bay at 0544hrs on Tuesday, 02 May 2006 and arrived in St. Helena’s airspace at1045hrs.  Onboard, except for the crew, were Jamie Jamieson & Tony Webb, Aviation Consultants from WA Atkins and Ian Ramsay from Air Safety Support International.


 


Most of St. Helena’s population turned out at Bradley’s to watch history being made and the Island’s schoolchildren, many of whom had never seen an airplane, were transported to the site. Government Officials, also excited over the occasion, were there, hoping for a successful trial and praying that there were no accidents. Everyone stoically endured drizzling rain and the mud at Bradley’s, hoping to not miss out on any maneuver of the Hercules.


 


Weather conditions over the Island included fog, light rain and a cloud level lower than the Peaks but by the time the plane arrived the clouds lifted from the site.


 


Cable & Wireless Plc, through Senior Operator Gilbert Legg, Nikita Crowie and Kyle Yon, had radio contact via HF and VHF with the aircraft from shortly after take-off until she left the Island’s airspace at 1212hrs.


 


The C130 was guided in to the runway site with smoke from burning tires placed in drums along the proposed alignment.  Simulated approaches and take-offs took place over Prosperous Bay Plain in order to investigate wind and visibility issues.   The exercise also verified that it was possible to safely use the proposed runway alignment.  Always agile, the Hercules at one point buzzed the Plain at 50 ft. The pilot gave his altimeter reading to Cable & Wireless operators while they were making the run.


 


Finally the plane took a wide turn around and did a fly-past of James Bay before returning to Namibia.


 


St Helena Access Project Manager, Sharon Wainwright said, “The trials had been very successful but had taken their toll on the persons involved, due to the tension and excitement on the day.”


 


 


 


ENGINE BREAK-DOWN DELAYS OFFLOADING RMS


 


By J. Brock (SARTMA)


 


Source: St. Helena Herald


 


Andrew Weir Shipping Ltd have reported via the RMS St Helena that at about twenty past three in the morning on Monday, 01 May 2006 the port main engine of the RMS St Helena was shut down due to an apparent clutch failure.


 


When the incident occurred the RMS was 255 nautical miles south west of Luderitz. The engine’s shaft was locked and propeller set at zero. The RMS proceeded to St Helena making 10.8kts.and arrived in James Bay on Wednesday, 03 May 2006 - 33 hours later than expected. On Wednesday Ascension Island reported that they had heavy swells and no cargo or passengers could safely come ashore upon the arrival of the RMS. High seas prevented wharf activity in Georgetown. RMS Engineer, Tim Walpole, with spares, was flown to Ascension from the UK, where he was off duty, to help with the repairs of the faulty clutch.


 


Stevedores had only one day to discharge 830 tonnes of cargo, which was a challenge as each container has to be taken ashore on a barge. A crane on the RMS broke down on Wednesday afternoon, which suspended the offloading until Thursday.


 

 

This article is the Property and Copyright of Saint Helena Herald.

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