South Atlantic Remote Territories Media Association - Falkland Islands, Saint Helena, Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha The latest news from the Falkland Islands, Saint Helena, Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha The news that matters from the
British Territories in the South Atlantic Ocean.
 HOME
 CONTACT US
 MAILING LIST
 LINKS
 SUBMIT AN ARTICLE
 WEATHER INFO (0)
 TOURISM/TRAVEL (4)
 SNIPPETS (0)
 SHIPPING/FREIGHT (1)
 MINERAL RESOURCES (2)
 LEGAL (13)
 HERITAGE (15)
 HEALTH (16)
 GEOLOGICAL EVENTS (0)
 GEN - GOVERNMENT (7)
 FISHERIES (9)
 ENVIRONMENT (1)
 EDUCATION (6)
 BUSINESS NEWS (16)
 AGRICULTURE (5)
 ALL ISLANDS (95)
 ASCENSION ISLAND (1)
 BRIT.ANTARCTIC TER. (0)
 FALKLAND ISLANDS (35)
 S.ATLANTIC GENERAL (6)
 SAINT HELENA (40)
 SOUTH GEORGIA (6)
 TRISTAN DA CUNHA (6)
Sponsored Links


Home | Categories | Agriculture Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Falklands : REDUCING THE IMPACT OF CLA IN SHEEP: STEVE POINTING SETS THE RECORD STRAIGHT
Submitted by Falkland Islands News Network (Juanita Brock) 12.07.2014 (Current Article)

One of the best presentations about animal diseases during Farmers’ Week Stanley was given on Thursday morning by Steve Pointing.

REDUCING THE IMPACT OF CLA IN SHEEP: STEVE POINTING SETS THE RECORD STRAIGHT

By J. Brock (FINN)

One of the best presentations about animal diseases during Farmers’ Week Stanley was given on Thursday morning by Steve Pointing. He explained that CLA is Caseous lymphadentis and is a problem in the major sheep producing nations of the world. Though also present in goats he focused on sheep during the lecture.

Mr Pointing said that the disease is caused when the bacterium, coryenbacterium pseudotuberculosis enters the sheep through abrasions on the skin normally during shearing. It is difficult to impossible to cure once a sheep is infected. Mr Pointing emphasised that a sheep may look healthy enough but the lesions and abscesses could form on the internal organs of a sheep. Pictures of affected internal organs accompanied the presentation.

There are several primary methods that can be used to reduce the incidence and effect of CLA in sheep and he pointed them out:

1. Only buy animals if it is necessary as healthy looking sheep from an infected flock may have affected internal organs.
2. Buy sheep that are from a flock that has been monitored for CLA
3. Get assurances from the previous owner that CLA cases (if any) in the flock have been thoroughly investigated
4. Quarantine bought in animals for at least four weeks and examine them regularly for lumps or scars particularly in the head or neck region before you introduce the animal into the general flock

Common sense will tell you that a strict regime of hygiene in the sheering shed and the immediate treatment of sheep that have been cut during shearing are good ways to keep CLA under control. Mr Pointing also recommends vaccinating healthy animals against CLA. People working in the shed should make sure their clothes, equipment and protective gear are clean and disinfected.

Culling out sheep with obvious boils and segregating those with discharging boils can help but the measures recommended thus far are only the starting point for keeping CLA under control. Regular testing for the disease is also recommended. Farmers need to be vigilant in all aspects of CLA prevention, as the problem will not go away until a cure can be found and this could take some time.

Photos of Mr Pointing’s lecture can be found in the June/July Wool Press.

 

This article is the Property and Copyright of Falkland Islands News Network.

      Powered by NIC.SHCopyright © 1993-2014 SARTMA.comDesign by CrownNet