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The Tristan Times - Tristan da Cunha
The online newspaper of Tristan da Cunha
  Issue No. 568 Online Edition Wednesday 17 September 2014 
Home | Categories | Environment Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Tristan : GOUGH ISLAND RESEARCHERS PRESENT FINDINGS AT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Submitted by Tristan Times (Juanita Brock) 03.06.2011 (Article Archived on 17.06.2011)

Graham Parker and Kalinka Rexer-Huber at the Chamber of Commerce Function Room on Thursday night.

Photo © J. Brock (Tristan Times)

 

Graham Parker and Kalinka Rexer-Huber at the Chamber of Commerce Function Room on Thursday night.

Photo © J. Brock (Tristan Times)

GOUGH ISLAND RESEARCHERS PRESENT FINDINGS AT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

 

By J. Brock (Tristan Times)

 

 

Two researchers who spent 13 months on Gough Island, a dependency of Tristan da Cunha, have presented their findings at the Chamber of Commerce on Thursday night.

 

Their talk covered the physical aspects of the island as well as the weather, flora and fauna.  The power point presentation focused in on assessing the islandís native species as well as putting together a plan to eradicate invasive species from the remote island in the South Atlantic.

 

Though at 40S, the island hosts many plant and animal species native to sub-Antarctic islands, as well as those from tropical areas.  Their research shows that native species have declined since they were last counted.  Ground nesting birds as well as nesting chicks have been attacked by mice that have adapted to and reproduced on Gough Island.  To bring the point home attacks were photographed as well as the resulting injuries to birds these attacks caused.  Predatory birds managed to prey on weakened birds and cause a decline in the populations of Tristan Albatross, Yellow Nosed Albatross and other chicks left alone while their parents foraged at sea.  It is thought that mice preying on vulnerable nesting birds might be the reason for declining native species but eradicating them could cause damage to healthy populations of birds if it is not done properly.  To check feasibility of spreading poisoned baits the team spread baits permeated with red dye to see if the mice would take it; and they did.  Another part of the eradication involved catching native birds and putting them in portable aviaries.

 

On Gough Island Mr Parker and Ms Rexer-Huber lived in a tent in the field; and at the South African Weather station located on the Island.

 

 

 

 

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